Difference Between Plantar Fasciitis and Achilles Tendonitis

Plantar Fasciitis and Achilles Tendonitis are two of the most common causes of pain in the foot and lower leg. Both conditions involve inflammation of the soft tissues of the foot, but they are distinct …

Plantar Fasciitis and Achilles Tendonitis are two of the most common causes of pain in the foot and lower leg. Both conditions involve inflammation of the soft tissues of the foot, but they are distinct conditions with distinct causes and treatments. Understanding the differences between the two can help you get the right diagnosis and treatment.

Plantar Fasciitis is an inflammation of the plantar fascia, a thick band of tissue that connects the heel bone to the toes and provides support for the arch of the foot. The condition is most common in people who are active, especially if they engage in activities that involve a lot of running or jumping. It is also more common in people who wear shoes that do not provide adequate support and in those who have high arches or flat feet. Symptoms include sharp pain near the heel that is worse in the morning, pain in the arch of the foot, and difficulty walking.

Achilles Tendonitis is an inflammation of the Achilles tendon, the thick cord of tissue that connects the calf muscles to the heel bone. The condition is commonly seen in athletes, particularly runners, who put a lot of pressure on their Achilles tendon when they run. It is also more common in people who have tight calf muscles or flat feet. Symptoms include pain and stiffness along the back of the leg, swelling in the area, and difficulty standing on the toes.

Treatment for both conditions involves relieving the inflammation and reducing the pressure on the affected area. This can include rest, ice, compression, elevation, stretching, and physical therapy. In some cases, a doctor may prescribe anti-inflammatory medications or corticosteroid injections to help reduce the inflammation. Surgery may be recommended if the condition does not respond to other treatments.

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When it comes to Plantar Fasciitis and Achilles Tendonitis, the most important thing is to get an accurate diagnosis so that you can get the right treatment. Understanding the differences between the two conditions can help you make an informed decision about your treatment.

Difference in Location

Plantar fasciitis and Achilles tendonitis are both common forms of tendonitis, which is an inflammation of the tendons. However, they are both located in different areas of the body. Plantar fasciitis affects the tissue on the bottom of the foot, known as the plantar fascia. This tissue supports the arch of the foot and connects the heel bone to the toes. Achilles tendonitis affects the large tendon in the back of the ankle, called the Achilles tendon. This tendon connects the calf muscles to the heel bone and is important for movement of the foot.

Difference in Symptoms

The symptoms of plantar fasciitis and Achilles tendonitis are also different. Plantar fasciitis is typically characterized by heel pain, which is often most severe when first standing from rest in the morning. It can also cause pain when walking or standing for long periods of time, as well as swelling in the arch of the foot.

Achilles tendonitis, on the other hand, is characterized by pain in the back of the ankle. This pain is typically aggravated by activities such as running and jumping, and can also cause swelling and tenderness in the area.

Difference in Treatment

The treatment of plantar fasciitis and Achilles tendonitis also differs. Treatment for plantar fasciitis typically includes rest, stretching, and physical therapy. Over-the-counter medications may also be used for pain relief. In more severe cases, orthotics or a night splint may be used to support the arch of the foot and reduce symptoms.

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Achilles tendonitis treatment often involves rest, stretching, and physical therapy as well. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may also be used to reduce inflammation and pain. In severe cases, a course of corticosteroid injections may be used. Surgery may be necessary in extreme cases.

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