Difference Between Alcoholics Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous

Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and Narcotics Anonymous (NA) are two of the most well-known and popular 12-step programs available to people seeking help for addiction. Both organizations offer support and guidance to individuals in their journey …

Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and Narcotics Anonymous (NA) are two of the most well-known and popular 12-step programs available to people seeking help for addiction. Both organizations offer support and guidance to individuals in their journey of recovery. While both organizations are dedicated to helping people overcome their addiction, there are several key differences between AA and NA that should be noted.

Goals and Focus
The primary goal of AA is to help members achieve and maintain sobriety from alcohol, while the primary goal of NA is to help members achieve and maintain sobriety from all forms of drugs, including alcohol. AA restricts membership to those who have a problem with alcohol only and does not allow members to be in recovery from any other substances. NA, on the other hand, is open to people with all types of addiction, including alcohol.

Membership
AA is a well-established organization, with more than two million members worldwide. Membership is open to anyone who identifies as an alcoholic, regardless of age, gender, race, or religion. NA, however, is a relatively new organization, with fewer members than AA. Membership is open to anyone who identifies as an addict, regardless of age, gender, race, or religion.

Meetings and Structure
AA and NA both host regular meetings, but the structure and programming of each organization varies. AA meetings are generally structured with an emphasis on the 12 steps, and members often share their experiences and stories. NA meetings, on the other hand, are typically less structured and focus on the 12 steps as well as the principles of recovery.

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Programs
Both AA and NA offer various programs and resources for members, such as literature, sponsorships, and support groups. AA offers a wide range of literature, including the Big Book and other books related to recovery. NA also offers literature, such as the Narcotics Anonymous Basic Text. Both organizations provide sponsorships, where members can find a mentor to help them on their journey of recovery.

Conclusion
AA and NA are both invaluable resources for individuals seeking help for addiction. While both organizations provide support and guidance, there are several key differences between the two, including goals, membership, meetings, and programs. It is important to understand these differences in order to make an informed decision about which organization is best suited for your needs.

1. Origins

Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) was founded in 1935 by two alcoholics, Bill Wilson and Dr. Bob Smith. It is the founding organization of the 12-step recovery program and was built on the principles of spiritual growth, service, and fellowship. Narcotics Anonymous (NA) was founded in 1953. It was created in response to the lack of support for recovering addicts of drugs other than alcohol. Both AA and NA are international fellowship programs, that follow the same 12-step program and are based on the same spiritual principles. Both organizations offer support and guidance for individuals seeking recovery from addiction.

2. Meetings

Both AA and NA offer meetings for members to attend, with an emphasis on community and peer support. AA meetings generally last for one hour and are open to any individual seeking recovery from alcoholism. They include a discussion of the 12 steps and related questions, as well as a sharing of experiences, strength, and hope. NA meetings also last one hour, but focus on recovering from addiction to drugs. They include a discussion of the 12 steps and related topics, as well as a sharing of experiences and strength.

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3. Membership

AA and NA both have open membership. To become a member of either organization, one must be willing to work the 12 steps and accept the fellowship’s spiritual principles. There are no requirements for membership in either organization and anyone is welcome to attend meetings, regardless of their background. Additionally, both organizations are free and open to the public, though donations are accepted to help fund meetings and other activities.

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